Dental Implants

Most implants (about 80 to 90 percent of them) today are single-unit cases that are administered to patients with adequate bone in the area of implantation. A popular and an accessible mode of dental treatment, implants can therefore be executed with a high degree of precision by following some simple steps.

The commonest cases of single-unit implants are either a lost tooth due to an accident or injury or a case of failed endodontic treatment. The best methodology that is followed by especially new implant practitioners are preparing the ridge, allowing the site to heal, placing the implant and finally delivering the crown.

Since accidental cases or failed treatments are the most common ones, implant restoration of your lost tooth is best executed with the aid of the following steps:

Step 1: Tooth Extraction

Your tooth is removed with perfection, keeping in mind that the buccal plate and the surrounding bone should be kept intact as much as possible. Using a very fine diamond bur to trace around the root, periotomes are sometimes situated between the root and the bone to aid painless removal.

Step 2: Grafting the Socket

To solidify an implant application, it is important to preserve the bone of the extraction site. This is done by grafting the socket. At first the place is cleared off (from any granular material) with a surgical curette. The walls of the site is then scraped and irrigated using a CK-6 scaler to initiate some bleeding. At this point, the socket is filled up to the crest of bone with some grafting material and then closed with a simple suture.

Step 3: Allow the Extraction Site to Heal

It takes about four months for the extraction site to heal and the graft to grow. This duration is crucial for the implants to settle down strong and long-lasting.

Step 4: Verifying the implant placement site

After the socket site has healed, once the patient returns for placement of the implant, the previous steps are followed again. That is to say, the buccal plate should be intact and the site needs to have adequate ridge height and width. The site can be evaluated intraorally and radiographically for this purpose and the bone volume is verified.

Step 5: Implant Diameter measurement

In this step, the diameter of the implant to be placed is determined following which the patient is anesthetized.

Step 6: Placement of implant via flapless surgery

Flapless implant placement is an excellent option because it is minimally invasive. It also reduces disruption to the blood supply and facilitates a smooth healing process. The flapless procedure is begun using a tissue punch to create an opening for the implant placement in the appropriate location, noting that it should be situated 1.5 mm from the adjacent teeth!

Step 7: Place a Healing Abutment

Instead of placing a cover screw (after the implant has been embedded), a healing abutment, can be delivered. In doing so, it is important to ensure that the healing abutment is out of occlusion. This indeed keeps any forces being applied on the implant during its healing phase.

Step 8: Deliver the Crown

Finally, the crown that is delivered is screw-retained. The healing abutment needs to be removed now. These crowns are esthetic, predictable, and an excellent choice for single tooth implant cases. CAD/CAM-produced restorations excel in achieving a precise fit and a natural appearance that is inclusive of the perfect shape, contours and margins.

Before your crown is delivered (i.e. when you return after three months from the placement of your implant) the impression of your tooth is captured. This actually ensures the apparent natural emergence of the tooth! Implants today are thus powerful sources of building self confidence in individuals and boosting them too.

Above all, single-unit extractions are not only creating predictable and remarkable results but also developing surgical and restorative skills among the aspirant implant practitioners!

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